• Klein’s pupil in the studio seemed to be trying to erase his presence through sheer aggression. Had Mozart started that way? Till didn’t think so.

  • In 1961 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer had purchased Verve Records from Norman Granz. Creed Taylor became the new executive director, and made a number of crucial policy decisions, including the sacking of the majority of Verve’s contract artists. One of a handful to survive was

  • Club Havana was known for hosting decent Afro-Cuban jazz bands. There was dancing Thursdays through Sundays, and Sunday afternoons, the management handed out free cigars. Hector became close to the house band, whose rhythm section inspired him.

  • This edition features a selection of “glamour girl” covers !

  • "Till's Piano Lesson" -- Short Fiction Contest-winning story
  • Great Encounters: In the studio with Bill Evans and Stan Getz
  • "A Man's Hands En Clave" -- a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • Cover Stories with Paul Morris, Vol. 11
dondewey2 Literature » Short Fiction

Short Fiction Contest-winning story #38 — “Till’s Piano Lesson,” by Don Dewey

New Short Fiction Award

Three times a year, we award a writer who submits, in our opinion, the best original, previously unpublished work.


Don Dewey of Jamaica, New York is the winner of the 38th Jerry Jazz Musician New Short Fiction Award, announced and published for the first time on March 5, 2015.


Till’s Piano Lesson

by

Don Dewey


_______________________________

“You’re early, Till. I told you never come early.”

“Sorry. I guess my watch is off.”

“Buy a new one.”

Klein refit the crutches under his armpits and swung his crabbed legs back toward the studio, leaving Till to enter the living room for himself. Till didn’t like living rooms. He thought them banal in their predictable assembly of tables, chairs, lamps, and rugs. What he wanted to see someday was a living room with people who dropped dead as soon as they put a foot outside it. Living rooms should have been what they claimed to be.

Klein’s pupil in the studio seemed to be trying to erase his presence through sheer aggression. Had Mozart started that way? Till didn’t think so.

[…] Continue reading »

josephine Uncategorized

“Josephine (Baker) and I” opens in New York

The British actress Cush Jumbo is portraying the American singer/dancer/actress/civil rights activist Josephine Baker in her solo show, “Josephine and I,” which opens in New York’s Joe’s Pub at the Public Theater on March 10. The critically acclaimed show (called a “dazzling performance” by the Guardian’s Michael Billington) ran for some time in London’s Bush Theater, and according to the New York Times, “juxtaposes Baker’s fabled career with a more […] Continue reading »

keepnews2 Features » In Memoriam

Orrin Keepnews, 1923 – 2015

I awoke to the very sad news that a prominent figure in the history of jazz music has died. Orrin Keepnews, whose work as co-founder of Riverside Records forever connected him to the lives and spirits of Bill Evans, Thelonious Monk, Cannonball Adderley, and so many other great jazz musicians of mid-century America, died in California at the age of 91 (a day shy of his 92nd birthday).

Keepnews was a transcendent figure in jazz music, excelling as a journalist, entrepreneur, and producer. The recordings he produced were among the very first to […] Continue reading »

coltraneblue Literature

“Traveling Magic” — a short story homage to John Coltrane, by Kay Sexton

In anticipation of the publication of our soon-to-be announced Short Fiction winning story, I reached back into the archives and re-discovered this excellent story by Kay Sexton, “Traveling Magic,” which is a series of scenes all linked by train travel, and an homage to John Coltrane.

_____

Frannie Moore lifts the sax. In the moments before they swing in behind her, the band hear the train sliding its way through the windy city. The noise is subliminal, visceral: if you play here much it becomes part of the music. Frannie breathes deep and opens her heart to the world …

[…] Continue reading »

jazzabird1 Literature » Poetry

“Bird” — a poem by Ed Coletti

I recall you
dream weaver
I remember you
You’re the one
who makes most dreams
come true
Sir Charles
just not your own
when the sax
ceases dreadfully
heroes fall
trumpets screech
Max Roach calls you
to attention
Sir Charles
listen to Diz
man just don’t fade man!

I hear Lover again
Bird you’re with me
like my mother’s voice
[…] Continue reading »